Liquorice licked

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Confectionery

The strong taste of salty liquorice presents manufacturers with an
on-going problem, writes UK microencapsulates company TasteTech
this week.

The ultimately strong taste of salty liquorice, widely popular in Scandinavian and North European countries, presents manufacturers with an on-going problem, writes UK microencapsulates company TasteTech this week.

Moisture from the surrounding air is absorbed by the product, which can then have an impact on the overall appearance and taste of the product. TasteTech claims to have come up with a solution to this problem with the development of a method for controlling the release of ammonium chloride - the main ingredient used on the surface of liquorice - that hinders any unwanted contact from the atmosphere.

"Our controlled release technology is enabling consumers to enjoy liquorice products even more, because not only are they more visually appealing, but the flavour locks in until the moment they are eaten. Confectionery manufacturers can now enter these countries with new, mouth-watering creations,"​ said Roger Sinton, managing director of TasteTech.

The process works by microencapsulating the ammonium chloride in a microfilm of hardened vegetable oil to produce a free-flowing powder. The invisible barrier of the encapsulate is only released when it is controlled to do so, through heating, chewing or a change in pH.

Related topics: Processing & Packaging

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