Corbion’s Purac powder receives approval for sour confectionery use in Canada

By Douglas Yu contact

- Last updated on GMT

Purac powder can instantly create sour flavor without damaging the quality of confectionery products, claims supplier Corbion
Purac powder can instantly create sour flavor without damaging the quality of confectionery products, claims supplier Corbion

Related tags: Flavor

Canadian confectionery manufacturers are now able to use sodium hydrogen malate-added powder, developed by Corbion, to improve the sour flavor profile of their products, says the supplier.

Corbion’s ingredient, which is used in acid sanding of soft panned confectionery, is called Purac powder MA. The powder is already available in the US and Europe.

“Unlike other malic acids, our Purac powder isn’t coated with fat, which means the end product has a cleaner taste profile,”​ Corbion told ConfectioneryNews.

The company received an EU patent​ last year to become the only supplier that offers this type of acid powder to the confectionery market.

Creating instant sour flavors and longer shelf life

Corbion said its Purac powder is fat-free coated malic acid and it remains stable even in fat-sensitive products with an extended shelf life.

“[Purac] delivers a long-lasting sour taste,”​ the company said.

In addition, Purac helps minimize sour confectionery-related issues, such as acid migration, gelatin degradation stickiness and off-flavors.

“For example, in applications like marshmallows, Purac enables producers to develop instant sour-tasting products while maintaining premium quality and optimum shelf life.”​ Corbion added.

Increasing demand for sour candy products is driving Corbion to expand the powder to international markets, the company said.

“Across the globe, sour confectionery remains a firm favorite among consumers… In addition to taste trends, consumers are also increasingly seeking more authentic and ‘cleaner’ foods.”

Approval process

For the approval of sodium hydrogen malate, Corbion first had to make a new food additive submission to Health Canada, the federal department that helps Canadians improve their health.

“Working with a consultant, we also had to get environmental approval from Environment Canada for sodium hydrogen malate since it had not been used in Canada before,”​ the company said.

Malic acid is already approved in Canada, so once sodium hydrogen malate was approved, Corbion was permitted to introduce Purac to the country.

Corbion said Canadian confectionery manufacturers had shown interest in applying Purac in acid-sanded sugar confectionery prior to its approval. The company says it is currently in discussions with other interested confectioners in the country.

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