Confectionery

Fudge Kitchen rebrand promotes luxury and sustainability credentials

By Anthony Myers contact

- Last updated on GMT

Fudge Kitchen will be phasing in its new eco-packaging. Photo: Fudge Kitchen
Fudge Kitchen will be phasing in its new eco-packaging. Photo: Fudge Kitchen

Related tags: Luker Chocolate, Fudge Kitchen

British high street artisan Fudge makers, Fudge Kitchen, has announced a major rebrand across its entire product range, shop fronts & website to push its sustainability credentials.

The new branding sees the Fudge Kitchen logo changing for the first time since 2012, and becoming a far more overt feature across all their product lines.

Managing Director, Sian Holt, says “The branding change initially came about as we wanted to align the personality of our six high street shops with the premium gifting positioning of our wholesale and ecommerce sides.

“As part of this review, we felt it was the perfect time to explore more sustainable packaging options, whilst maintaining the artisanal luxury that Fudge Kitchen is known for​.”

The company said it will phase in the changes, prioritising packaging and website design to begin with then following on with shop signage, uniforms and events & marketing assets.

Marketing Manager, Richard Parson, said: “At Fudge Kitchen it was important for us to create a recognisable & consistent identity across all our channels and touchpoints, particularly our retail and online experiences.

“The pandemic gave us the time and opportunity to take stock and improve our customer service experience. We also underwent a complete range review, increasing our most popular product offerings and flavours.”

The packaging update has the company moving to UK printed packaging, dramatically reducing its carbon footprint.

As part of the rebrand the Kent-based confectioner has also recently switched to a new and more ethical chocolate supplier, Luker Chocolate. Alongside this, they are also beginning to phase out internationally grown cane sugar in favour of beet sugar grown in Norfolk.

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