Sheer decadence

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Related tags: Marketing, Advertising, Cadbury plc, Datamonitor

Unwrapping a Cadbury's Flake can offer female consumers a moment of
pure pleasure in their otherwise hectic days - at least according
to the latest advertising campaign for the brand.

British confectionery group Cadbury Trebor Basset is launching a new mail marketing drive for its Flake counterline bar which claims that unwrapping the chocolate bar provides a moment of pure pleasure in an otherwise stressful day.

The campaign, aimed squarely at female consumers, centres on the concept of indulgence and pleasure, using the 'unwrap moments of pure pleasure' and featuring mailings designed in the shape of a Flake bar.

The goal of the campaign is to drive home the association between unwrapping a Flake and a momentary indulgence, and according to market analyst Datamonitor​, this is a sound position for chocolate and confectionery products to adopt.

Both Galaxy, from Mars, and Cadbury's own Dairy Milk brand have recently launched similar campaigns based on creating strong emotional resonance with the product, Datamonitor said. "This escapism and 'antidote to reality' approach targets an important desire: taking a break from the stresses of the day and giving oneself a treat."

Chocolate, of course, has always been a product with a liberal dose of indulgence, and marketers have frequently played on this aspect in their advertising campaigns. Flake itself, for example, has consistently targeted female consumers.

Datamonitor argues that women are more open to this indulgent approach, since they have more pressure on their time than men and consequently cannot look forward to a later opportunity to relax. EU statistics show that women spend more time on household chores than men and sleep less. For women, therefore, the prospect of instant gratification in the form of a chocolate bar is a more tempting offer, the analysts suggest.

The need for daily indulgence also carries beyond confectionery, of course, and other non-food manufacturers are increasingly adopting this highly targeted approach in their advertising, with products as diverse as women's shower gels, haircare products and toiletries all marketed as offering a moment of pleasure in an otherwise routine day.

"Everyday treating is an important concept in marketing indulgent products to women as it highlights a real value that the product can offer. Cadbury's attempt to re-enforce this by emphasising the ritualistic action of opening the Flake wrapper is a sound part of this strategy,"​ Datamonitor concludes.

Related topics: Processing & Packaging

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