What’s in a name? Reese’s Take5 signals a new era of the 5-layer bar

By Kristine Sherred contact

- Last updated on GMT

Hershey tried to invigorate the brand in 2016 with a brand revamp, on right. It hopes the iconic Reese's name and orange color to the wrapper, on left, will bring the bar out of the shadows.
Hershey tried to invigorate the brand in 2016 with a brand revamp, on right. It hopes the iconic Reese's name and orange color to the wrapper, on left, will bring the bar out of the shadows.

Related tags: Hershey, Hershey's, Reese's peanut butter cups, Candy bar, Chocolate bars, Peanut butter, Peanut butter cups, brand identity, Marketing, Product launches

Hershey, which will relaunch its version of the peanut, pretzel, caramel and chocolate candy this summer, asked consumers to compare old and new: the Reese’s name won them over.

In admittedly unscientific experiments, Hershey gave consumers the same bar – without telling them that tidbit – in two different wrappers. One boasted Reese’s; the other one didn’t.

The confectioner claims that participants ‘lost their minds’ over the former. A promotional video shows pairs of unwitting consumers taste-testing both versions​. “Reese’s with pretzels?”​ one of the participants eagerly asks. Upon being informed that they are, in fact, the same exact candy, another replies, “You’ve been using Reese’s peanut butter this whole time?”

So what happened?

Take5 has languished on checkout counters and candy aisles since Hershey introduced the bar in 2004, with one Forbes contributor considering it perhaps the ‘most undervalued brand in the world.’

OG Take5
The original Take5 wrapper

Hershey attempted to inject the brand with millennial horsepower in 2016, redesigning the packaging from its original, classic-candy-bar-style of red, white and yellow, to meld with contemporary aesthetics – or so it thought. Since then, the bar has sported a black wrapper with a white and neon-green logo, alongside an image of each of the five main ingredients: chocolate, peanuts, peanut butter, pretzels and caramel. An accompanying promotional campaign targeted millennials through bright colors, the idea of ‘disruption,’ and ‘being yourself.’

Flash forward three years later, and Hershey has doubled-down on what it says makes the Take5 bar so revered in the mouths of consumers: Reese’s peanut butter.

Indeed, a recent candy bar power ranking in the Los Angeles Times ranked Take5 number one of 30​, calling it ‘an unbeatable combination.’ But its wrapper left much to be desired, falling to number 24. (Reese’s Fast Break bar also made the list at number 23.)

“It’s time the world learns why they’ve always loved Take5 bars so much,”​ said Jack Wilder, Reese’s senior brand manager. “But more importantly, it’s time that they Take5 bar goes to its rightful owner, Reese’s.”

The new packaging will hit US shelves in mid-summer, according to Hershey. The 1.5oz bar will run for an RRP of $0.99, a 2.25oz king-size for $1.69, and an 11.25oz bag of snack-sized bars for $4.29.

Related news

Show more

Follow us

Featured Events

View more

Products

View more

Webinars