Plant-based

Butterm!lk launches plant-powered sharing treats for Christmas

By Anthony Myers contact

- Last updated on GMT

Butterm!lk' 'Speculoos' Christmas Truffles Pic: Butterm!lk
Butterm!lk' 'Speculoos' Christmas Truffles Pic: Butterm!lk

Related tags: plant based, Dairy alternatives, vegan, Npd, Chocolate

Vegan chocolate brand Butterm!lk has announced two new lines, specifically aimed at the festive season.

The family-run, plant-based business, with 60 years of confectionary expertise in the UK, is launching Orange Choccy Segments and Choccy Truffles with Spiced Caramel Speculoos Flavour. Rolling into stores in time for the Christmas shop.

It caps a productive year for the brand which has developed 17 new SKUs in the last 12 months alone – and is part of Buttermi!k’s mission to deliver plant-powered versions of classic favourites.  

The Orange Choccy Segments are powered by plants, the knock-out bite-size slices of seriously thick dairy-free milk chocolate, with zingy citrus flavour that ‘are here to disrupt people’s perception of what choccy orange should be about’.

Its Butterm!lk Choccy Truffles with Spiced Caramel created with dairy-free chocolate and a plant-based shell, comes oozing with a spiced caramel and an alternative milk chocolate filling.

Both treats are made with only natural ingredients and are vegan and completely dairy free.

Butterm!lk founder Tracy McDonnell-Goad said: “We believe that everyone should be able to enjoy exceptional tasting treats, without compromising on taste, quality or value. Our consumers tell us, they want delicious choccy treats that just so happen to be dairy-free, plant-based and made with no nasties. 

“For an easy way to help look after our planet, swapping your treats for plant-powered choccies is a great way to reduce your carbon footprint.  Better for you, better for the planet. And of course, deliciously indulgent treats.”

The brand also pledges to be Zero Waste - only using packaging that's designed to be recyclable, containing recycled materials, or reusable.

Related topics: R&D

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